December 2011

Astounding Credit Card Statistics, Vol. 6

Welcome back to our continuing series, Astounding Credit Card Statistics! In this volume, we’ll be learning some insane stats on rewards cards, cards in circulation, total transactions, and more! Know your customers, your banks, and your processors well. If knowledge is half the battle, then Vision Payment Solutions is arming you with the information necessary to compete in a tough economy. Check out some of the data below!

Rewards:

  • More than one third of consumers choose which credit card to use in order to maximize card rewards. (Source: ComScore, September 2008)
  • Two-thirds of survey respondents said they would consider switching their primary credit card if a better feature were offered. (Source: ComScore, September 2008)
  • Among customers who said they would consider switching credit cards based on better rewards, more than two thirds (68 percent) said that cash back would be most influential in getting them to switch. (Source: ComScore, September 2008)

Circulation:

  • About 60 percent of consumers have a rewards credit card. (Source: “The Survey of Consumer Payment Choice,” Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, January 2010)
  • Visa says rewards cards now make up more than half of all credit cards and about 80 percent of money spent on a credit card. (Source: Aite Group, January 2008)
  • Consumers say rewards are the second-most important reason for choosing to apply for a specific credit card, behind no annual fees and ahead of low interest rates. (Source: Aite Group survey, January 2008)

 

Total Purchases/Transactions:

Issuer Purchase Volume
(through year-end 2010)

  • American Express: $131.1 billion (Source: American Express)
  • Discover cards: $92.5 billion (Source: Discover)
  • MasterCard credit: $479 billion (Source: MasterCard)
  • MasterCard debit: $333 billion (Source: MasterCard)
  • Visa credit: $809 billion (Source: Visa)
  • Visa debit: $1.05 trillion (Source: Visa)

Issuer Transaction Volume
(through year-end 2010)

  • American Express: Unavailable
  • Discover cards: Unavailable
  • MasterCard credit: 5.85 billion (Source: MasterCard)
  • MasterCard debit: 8.46 billion (Source: MasterCard)
  • Visa credit: 9.4 billion (Source: Visa)
  • Visa debit: 28.6 billion (Source: Visa)

Other:

  • Today, credit cards are responsible for more than $2.5 trillion in transactions a year and are accepted at more than 24 million locations in more than 200 countries and territories. (Source: American Bankers Association, March 2009)
  • Between 1989 and 2006, the nation’s total credit card charges increased from about $69 billion a year to more than $1.8 trillion. (Source: Demos.org, April 2008)
  • It is estimated that there are 10,000 payment card transactions made every second around the world. (Source: American Bankers Association, March 2009)

Vision Payment Solutions is your one-stop shopping experience for all card-processing needs; from hardware and software to superior technical support, VPS has all your credit card bases covered! Call us today!

 

Astounding Credit Card Statistics, Vol. 5

Welcome to the fifth installment of our continuing series, Astounding Credit Card Statistics. In this volume, you’ll learn a few facts about credit card interest rates and annual percentage rates (APRs), so you understand what your customers – and perhaps even you – are experiencing every day. Armed with a unique knowledge of credit cards, their interest rates, and more, you’ll be that much more prepared in your fight for profitability. Vision Payment Solutions encourages the responsible use of credit cards; we are your one-stop shop for all credit card-processing needs: hardware, software, and customer support. Get in touch with us today to start processing your customers’ credit cards!

Interest Rates & APRs

  • 36 percent of respondents said they didn’t know the interest rate on the card they use most often. (Source: FINRA Investor Education Foundation, “Financial Capability in the United States,” December 2009)
  • The national average default rate as January 2010 stood at 27.88 percent and the mean default rate is 28.99 percent. (Source: CreditCards.com survey, January 2010)
  • Slightly more than half of Americans — 51 percent — said that in the past 12 months, they carried over a balance and was charged interest on a credit card. (Source: “Financial Capability in the United States,” FINRA Investor Education Foundation, December 2009) 
  • 93 percent of cards allowed the issuer to raise any interest rate at any time by changing the account agreement. (Source: Pew Safe Credit Cards Project, March 2009)
  • Only eight percent of cards with penalty rate conditions offered to restore the original rate terms when payments are made on-time, usually after 12 months. (Source: Pew Safe Credit Cards Project, March 2009)
  • 72 percent of cards included offers of low promotional rates which  issuers could revoke after a single late payment. (Source: Pew Safe Credit Cards Project, March 2009)
  • Among 39 credit cards Consumer Action looked at from 22 financial institutions, the average interest rate for purchases was 12.83 percent. That’s a drop of more half a point from the 2008 survey results. Interest rates on purchases ranged from 4.25 percent to 22.99 percent, with the fixed rate credit cards averaging an interest rate of 10.03 percent and the variable rate credit cards averaging 13.20 percent. (Source: Consumer Action credit card survey, July 2009)
  • Average APR on new credit card offer: 14.10 percent (Source: CreditCards.com Weekly Rate Report, May 2010.)
  • Average APR on credit card with a balance on it: 14.67 percent, as of February, 2010 (Source: Federal Reserve’s G.19 report on consumer credit, May 2010)

 

Astounding Credit Card Statistics, Vol. 4

Welcome back to the fourth installment of our continuing series, Astounding Credit Card Statistics. In this volume, you’ll learn a few facts about credit card fees, and better understand what your customers – and perhaps even you – are experiencing every day. Armed with a superior knowledge of credit cards, their fees, and the demographics of your customer base, you’ll be that much more prepared in your daily struggle toward profitability.

Credit Card Fees

  • Penalty fees from credit cards will total about $20.5 billion in 2009, according to R. K. Hammer, a consultant to the credit card industry. (Source: New York Times, September 2009)
  • From 1989 to 2004, the percentage of cardholders incurring fees due to late payments of 60 days or more increased from 4.8 percent to 8.0 percent. (Source: Demos.org, “Borrowing To Make Ends Meet,” November 2007)
  • One-fourth of the students surveyed in US PIRG’s 2008 Campus Credit Card Trap report said that they have paid a late fee, and 15 percent have paid an “over the limit” fee. (Source: U.S. PIRG, “Campus Credit Card Trap”)
  • In the first 3 months of 2009, 27 percent of card offers carried an annual fee, up from 18 percent in 2008, according to the financial research firm Tower Group. (Source: ConsumerReports.org Money Blog, August 2009)
  • Thirty-one of the 39 credit cards did not charge an annual fee. That marked a larger number of credit cards with no annual fee than in 2008, when 35 of 41cards had no annual fee. The cost of those fees ranged from $18 to $150. (Source: Consumer Action credit card survey, July 2009)
  • The average late fee was found to have risen to $28.19, way up from $25.90 in 2008. Consumer Action reported that late fees reached up to $39 per incident. (Source: Consumer Action credit card survey, July 2009)
  • 92 percent of cards included a fee for exceeding the credit limit, including 100 percent of all student cards. The amount of the overlimit fee is $39 on most accounts. (Source: Pew Safe Credit Cards Project, March 2009)
  • 64 percent of respondents said having “no annual fee” was an important reason why they chose the credit card they did the last time they got a new card. (Source: Aite Group survey, January 2008)
  • 95 percent of surveyed issuers have over-limit fees. The average over-limit fee, among institutions with over-limit fees, is $29.13. (Source: Consumer Action credit card survey, July 2008.)

 

Astounding Credit Card Statistics, Vol. 3

It’s a topic many of us would rather keep under wraps, and those of us socially aware enough to understand the personal nature of credit card debt intentionally veer away from such conversations in social or leisure settings, but debt has become – for some – a virtually unavoidable obstacle on the road to success. Whether you’re a merchant running a busy store (like so many of our clientele), a student who lives on borrowed money, or just a non-stop shopaholic, debt can be a crushing facet of everyday modern life.

Vision Payment Solutions advocates the responsible use of credit cards and spending. In the tradition of keeping our clients abreast of all the current, important credit card-related news and information, we present Volume Three of our Astounding Credit Card Statistics series:

  • In 2004, of those with credit cards, 84 percent of African-American households carried credit card debt compared with 54 percent of white households. (Source: Demos.org, “Borrowing To Make Ends Meet,” November 2007)
  • Over 90 percent of African-American families earning between $10,000 and $24,999 had credit card debt. (Source: Demos.org study, November 2007)
  • Undergraduates are carrying record-high credit card balances. The average (mean) balance grew to $3,173, the highest in the years the study has been conducted. Median debt grew from 2004’s $946 to $1,645. Twenty-one percent of undergraduates had balances between $3,000 and $7,000, also up from the last study. (Source: Sallie Mae, “How Undergraduate Students Use Credit Cards,” April 2009)
  • In Spring of 2008, only 15 percent of freshmen had a zero balance, down dramatically from 69 percent in the fall of 2004. The median debt freshmen carried was $939, nearly triple the $373 in 2004. (Source: Sallie Mae, “How Undergraduate Students Use Credit Cards,” April 2009)
  • Seniors graduated with an average credit card debt of more than $4,100, up from $2,900 almost four years ago. Close to one-fifth of seniors carried balances greater than $7,000. (Source: Sallie Mae, “How Undergraduate Students Use Credit Cards,” April 2009)
  • The average college graduate has nearly $20,000 in debt; average credit card debt has increased 47 percent between 1989 and 2004 for 25-to 34-year-olds, and 11 percent for 18- to 24-year-olds. Nearly one in five 18- to 24-year-olds is in “debt hardship,” up from 12 percent in 1989. (Source: Demos.org, “The Economic State of Young America,” May 2008)
  • Discussing credit card debt is highly taboo. The topics at the top of the list of things that people say they are very or somewhat unlikely to talk openly about with someone they just met were: The amount of credit card debt (81 percent); details of your love life (81 percent); your salary (77 percent); the amount you pay for your monthly mortgage or rent (72 percent); your health problems (62 percent); your weight (50 percent). (Source: CreditCards.com research, January 2009)

Vision Payment Solutions is an industry leader in credit card-processing software, hardware, and technical support. We provide merchants of all markets and industries with the equipment and knowledge needed to accept a variety of payment forms from their shoppers, and we also sustain small businesses through our equipment-leasing and capital-financing programs. Click “Apply Now” to get started today!

 

VPS Presents: An Introduction to Merchant Accounts

Today, Vision Payment Solutions would like to reach out to all those new business owners out there, whether or not they’re familiar with credit card processing, merchant accounts, payment gateways, or any related credit card industry terminology, and review some important market vocabulary. In this way, we can educate newcomers while simultaneously refreshing our other, more experienced clientele, and provide a clearer understanding of the concepts we manage every day. So, what do some of these credit card terms mean?

A merchant account is a specific kind of bank account that allows businesses to accept payments by debit or credit cards. A merchant account is established under an agreement between an acceptor and a merchant-acquiring bank for the settlement of credit card transactions, debit card transactions, or both. Often, a payment processor or independent sales organization is also a party to the merchant agreement, and can mediate functionality more efficiently. Whether a merchant enters into a merchant agreement directly with an acquiring bank, or via an aggregator, like PayPal, the agreement binds the merchant to obey the Operating Regulations established by the card brands.

These days, the vast majority of credit card transactions are transmitted electronically to merchant processing banks for authorization, capture and deposit. Various methods exist for presenting a credit card sale to the system. Either the credit card’s magnetic strip is read by a swipe through a credit card terminal, a computer chip is read, or the credit card information is manually entered into a credit card terminal, computer, or website. The earliest methods, submitting credit card slips to a merchant processing bank via snail mail, or accessing an Automated Response Unit (ARU) by telephone, are still used today, but electronic devices have largely bypassed this. Early techniques implemented two-part forms and a hand-operated device for mechanically imprinting the embossed credit card number information onto the forms.

A payment gateway is an e-commerce service that authorizes payments for e-businesses and online retailers. It is the equivalent of a physical POS (point-of-sale) terminal located in most retail outlets. A merchant account provider is typically a separate company from the payment gateway. Some merchant account providers have their own payment gateways but the majority of companies use 3rd party payment gateways. The gateway usually has two primary components, the virtual terminal that can allow for a merchant to securely login and key in credit card numbers, or have the website’s shopping cart connect to the gateway through an API, allowing real-time processing from the merchant’s website.

Vision Payment Solutions consistently arms its clientele with industry knowledge on merchant accounts, credit cards, and much more. VPS would like to wish all of our faithful merchants – and you newcomers, as well – a happy and healthy holiday season, and a happy new year!

 

Astounding Credit Card Statistics, Vol. 2

In our latest installment of Astounding Credit Card Statistics, we’ll be looking at some very interesting – and highly informative – numbers on cardholders’ credit limits, usage, and more! In the spirit of educating merchants just like you, Vision Payment Solutions believes in keeping its client base informed and up to date on all matters credit card related. After all, knowledge is half the battle!

Credit Limits & Usage

  • In 2007, 97 percent of consumers indicated they used a credit card in the past year. In 2008, that number sank to 72 percent. (Source: Javelin, “Credit Card Spending Declines” study, March 2009)
  • Credit card usage fell dramatically from 2007 to 2008, with only 64 percent of consumers indicating they used a credit card in the month preceding the September 2008 survey, compared to 87 percent of consumers in 2007 — a 23 percentage point decline. (Source: Javelin, “Credit Card Spending Declines” study, March 2009)
  • 80 percent of Americans 65 or older indicated they used a credit card in the month preceding the September 2008 survey. That’s 13 points higher than any other age group. They also used debit cards far less than other age groups. Only 47 percent of those over 65 said they had used a debit card in the month before the survey, 19 points lower than any other age group. (Source: Javelin, “Credit Card Spending Declines” study, March 2009)
  • 63 percent of Americans aged 25 to 34 indicated they had used a credit card in the month preceding the September 2008 survey. (Source: Javelin, “Credit Card Spending Declines” study, March 2009)
  • Just 51 percent of Americans aged 18 to 24 indicated they had used a credit card in the month preceding the September 2008 survey. 71 percent of that age group said that they had used a debit card in the same period. (Source: Javelin, “Credit Card Spending Declines” study, March 2009)
  • 92 percent of cards included a fee for exceeding the credit limit, including 100 percent of all student cards. The amount of the over-limit fee is $39 on most accounts. (Source: Pew Safe Credit Cards Project, March 2009)
  • For families having any bank-type cards, the median number of such cards remained at 2; the median credit limit on all such cards rose 21.4 percent, to $18,000, and the median interest rate on the card with the largest balance (or on the newest card, if no outstanding balances existed) rose 1.0 percentage point, to 12.5 percent. (Source: Federal Reserve Survey of Consumer Finances, February 2009)
  • 58 percent of Hispanics have not used a credit card in the past 30 days. (Source: Experian Consumer Research study, November 2008)
  • 31 percent of Hispanics typically pay cash for their purchases. (Source: Experian Consumer Research study, November 2008)
  • Approximately 14 percent of Americans use 50 percent or more of their available credit. (Source: Experian National Score Index Study, February 2007)
  • At about 17 percent each, Alaska and Hawaii have the largest concentration of consumers who use 50 percent or more of their available credit. (Source: Experian National Score Index Study, February 2007)
  • Residents of Jackson, Miss., use the highest percentage of their credit limit. (Source: Men’s Health magazine’s personal debt survey, July 2008)
  • Lincoln, Neb., residents use the lowest percentage of their credit limit. (Source: Men’s Health magazine’s personal debt survey, July 2008)

a�Sos���  � n’>American Express

  • Discover
  • US Bank
  • Wells Fargo
  • Chase
  • Barclaycard
  • Bank of America
  • Capital One
  • Citi
  • HSBC
  • (Source: J.D. Power and Associates)

    Bankruptcy/delinquency

    • U.S. credit card 60-day delinquency rate: 4.27 percent. (Source: Fitch Ratings, April 2010)

    Business credit cards

    • Credit cards are now the most common source of financing for America’s small-business owners. (Source: National Small Business Association survey, 2008)
    • 44 percent of small-business owners identified credit cards as a source of financing that their company had used in the previous 12 months – more than any other source of financing, including business earnings. In 1993, only 16 percent of small-businesses owners identified credit cards as a source of funding they had used in the preceding 12 months. (Source: National Small Business Association survey, 2008)

     

    Protecting Your Business from Retail Fraud

    Fraud, as many of you merchants out there might understand, can be a big profit-drainer. In fact, according to a 2010 study conducted by online lexical database LexisNexis, retailers lost approximately $139 billion to fraud in 2010. Worse, in what LexisNexis calls the “true cost of fraud,” every $100 lost to fraud leads to $310 in total losses, as merchants scramble to replace lost or stolen items.

    Additionally, the study found some other disturbing trends in retail fraud:

    • Consumers are much less likely to do business with a merchant after being victimized by scammers. More than one in three consumer fraud victims said they will avoid certain merchants after being victimized, one in four report they will spend less money, and nearly one in three will switch payment methods.
    • “Friendly fraud,” where a consumer buys an item and later disputes it, accounted for a fifth of fraud incidents affecting merchants.
    • Mobile payments yield the highest volume of fraudulent transactions; yet almost two in five merchants said they planned to accept mobile charges in the future.

    Some common theft tactics retailers should stay vigilant of include:

    Return fraud: Returns are a favorite form of fraud, costing retailers $3.48 billion. Return fraud is carried out in many ways, including:

    • Wardrobing, when consumers buy expensive items, such as televisions and fur coats, and then return the items after using them for holiday events. Profit losses from wardrobing can add up via chargebacks and shipping costs.
    • Fraudulent returns using items purchased with stolen or bogus credit or debit cards.
    • Cross-merchant, no-receipt returns.

    The National Retail Foundation says retailers should shorten return periods and reject returns from frequent returners. To avoid card abuse, merchants should invest in fraud protection software and watch for suspicious orders.

    Shipping fraud: Scam artists love express shipping because it’s harder for retailers to track purchases shipped in a day. Typically, the faster the thief gets a product, the harder it is to catch him. Monitor express shipping items and use address verification software. If it can’t verify an address, consider it a red flag.

    To make a long story short, an investment in payment and security software can be highly effective in stopping retail fraud. So can old-fashioned monitoring. Fraud artists love traditional methods of separating merchants from their cash. Keep an eye on high-volume orders, especially for pricey products, like TVs and audio equipment, and transactions involving multiple credit cards for shipments to one address. Lastly, use caution when shipping to international addresses.

     

    Astounding Card Statistics, Vol. 1

    Welcome to the first installation of our continuing blog series, Astounding Card Statistics! Within, you will find some numbers – some disturbing, others soothing – on credit card use, abuse, and more. As a merchant, you can stay informed of all the current industry happenings, and stay alert. Vision Payment Solutions strives to educate its clientele – and arm them with all the information they need in the confusing world of credit cards, so merchants just like you can stay ahead of the curve!

    Most popular statistics (according to searches)

    • Average credit card debt per household with credit card debt: $15,799
    • 609.8 million credit cards held by U.S. consumers. (Source: “The Survey of Consumer Payment Choice,” Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, January 2010)
    • Average number of credit cards held by cardholders: 3.5 (Source: “The Survey of Consumer Payment Choice,” Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, January 2010)
    • Average APR on a new credit card offer: 14.89 percent (Source: CreditCards.com Weekly Rate Report, July 20, 2011.)
    • Average APR on a credit card with a balance on it: 13.10 percent, as of May 2011 (Source: Federal Reserve’s G.19 report on consumer credit, released July 2011)
    • Total U.S. revolving debt (98 percent of which consists of credit card debt): $793.1 billion, as of May 2011 (Source: Federal Reserve’s G.19 report on consumer credit, released July 2011)
    • Total U.S. consumer debt: $2.43 trillion, as of May 2011 (Source: Federal Reserve’s G.19 report on consumer credit, released July 2011)
    • U.S. credit card 30-day delinquency rate: 3.3 percent. (Source: Moody’s, May 2011)

    Total credit cards in circulation in U.S.
(Through year-end 2010, unless otherwise noted)

    • American Express credit: 48.9 million (Source: AmericanExpress.com)
    • MasterCard credit: 171 million (Source: MasterCard)
    • MasterCard debit: 123 million (Source: MasterCard)
    • Visa credit: 269 million, as of Sept. 30, 2010 (Source: Visa)
    • Visa debit: 397 million, as of Sept. 30, 2010 (Source: Visa)
    • Discover cards: Data Unavailable

    Customer satisfaction

    (J.D. Power and Associates 2010 Credit Card Satisfaction Study Rankings)

    1. American Express
    2. Discover
    3. US Bank
    4. Wells Fargo
    5. Chase
    6. Barclaycard
    7. Bank of America
    8. Capital One
    9. Citi
    10. HSBC

    (Source: J.D. Power and Associates)

    Bankruptcy/delinquency

    • U.S. credit card 60-day delinquency rate: 4.27 percent. (Source: Fitch Ratings, April 2010)

    Business credit cards

    • Credit cards are now the most common source of financing for America’s small-business owners. (Source: National Small Business Association survey, 2008)
    • 44 percent of small-business owners identified credit cards as a source of financing that their company had used in the previous 12 months – more than any other source of financing, including business earnings. In 1993, only 16 percent of small-businesses owners identified credit cards as a source of funding they had used in the preceding 12 months. (Source: National Small Business Association survey, 2008)

     

    Rewards Cards: How Your Customers and Their Issuers Benefit

    Evidently, consumers are not alone in loving rewards cards; the card issuers are fond of them as well. To some people’s surprise, these rewards card programs are not just a perk of applying for and using certain kinds of credit cards – there are a few upsides for those who issue them.

    The New York Times has recently reported that the benefits of rewards cards are not entirely for the consumer. Credit card issuers have found – through their relentless study of consumer statistics and spending habits – that cardholders put approximately 75 percent of their spending on a single rewards card, rather than spreading it among many credit cards. This should make sense to some of you merchants out there who handle and manage money on a daily basis. If there’s a perk out there, why not take advantage of it?

    In fact, credit card issuers have found that while annual spending on a regular Visa card averages $5,200 per year, spending jumps to an average of $26,100 for a rewards card – nearly a five-fold increase in funds spent.

    This type of spending concentration can be a gold mine for the credit card issuers who can attract and retain cardholders with reward programs. Even though rewards card customers tend to pay off their card balances more frequently than those without rewards, the interchange income alone is very profitable; “interchange” refers to the fees charged to merchants for accepting credit cards, and is split between Visa or MasterCard – and the issuing bank.

    While it appears that low interest rates are the preferred advertising message for credit card issuers, it may be the rewards that are driving the most business and profits. Perhaps this is a classic example of a win/win situation for everyone involved. More spending benefits all parties (with the exception of those card carriers who accrue too much debt to easily pay off), especially you, the merchants, who are the facilitators of products and services purchases – chances are your profits increase vastly if you have customers browsing your store with a rewards card in their pockets. It’s also incentive to offer a rewards program of your own; proprietary rewards are equally enticing to your consumers, especially when they get a card that has the logo of their favorite shopping place on it.

    Vision Payment Solutions is a comprehensive, full-service credit card-processing company dedicated to helping merchants just like you acquire and implement credit card – and rewards card – hardware, software, technical support, and more. Get in touch with us today to start processing your customers’ credit cards with a minimum of fuss and maximum return on investment.

     

    Online PIN-Only Debit Card Processing: What Gives?

    In the tradition of always keeping our clients informed and educated about current industry developments, today we’ll address the issue of online, PIN-only debit card processing, perspectives on the topic from industry officials, and how it affects you, the merchant, in your daily card processing – and other online card processing – needs.

    Until just recently, no PIN-only debit card holder could use his card online. The online checkout flow and peripheral applications, coding, and databases, simply did not support a PIN-only scenario and related to a PIN-only debit card as to any other debit or credit signature card. No online payment page enabled entering just a PIN code, and the checkout flow did not pass the PIN code to the debit card issuer. As a result, online, PIN-only debit card transactions were declined, as the PIN needed to authenticate the transaction was missing.

    While most online merchants still do not accept PIN-only debit cards, first online PIN-only solutions are finally being developed, and new card processing solutions are on the way!

    To the joy of online shoppers everywhere, PULSE has recently introduced the PULSE® Internet PIN debit solution, which enables merchants to accept PIN-only debit cards issued by the PULSE issuers’ network. The solution enables shoppers to enter their PIN using a graphical, scrambling, PIN pad, which changes each time a digit is entered.

    The upcoming Durbin Bill is expected to accelerate the adoption of online PIN-only debit card processing methods. Though the Bill does not apply to PIN-only debit cards, it targets an issuer interchange cap of $0.12 for an online signature debit card transaction.

    As issuers will have to find a way to gain the lost interchange back, and as the suggested cap only applies to signature debit cards – yet does not apply to PIN-only debit cards – issuers’ one course of action would be aggressively marketing PIN-only debit cards over signature debit cards, and changing the debit card market. Such a change will provide merchants with a larger incentive to accept PIN-only debit cards to maintain their market share.

    Vision Payment Solutions is committed to providing the highest quality card processing solutions at the most reasonable cost possible. We offer all the hardware, software, and technical support you need to get your business breezing through card processing, and making all your customers happier, more loyal shoppers! Contact us today to find out about our equipment-leasing program, and see how we can help you with your business.